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Toyota Corolla Quest review - Media

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Toyota Corolla Quest review

Big on value

Toyota Corolla Quest review

In a world where the SUV is all the rage, some of us still believe that a sedan offers great all-round versatility, especially when it’s a value sedan like the Toyota Corolla Quest.

The Toyota Corolla Quest remains one of the best of the bunch when it comes to reminding us of how practical a sedan – the style of car that most of us grew up travelling in – is for everything from the weekly errands to the annual holiday.

The Quest is the budget-friendly variant in the Corolla line-up, and Toyota is able to offer it at the price they do because it is actually the previous generation Corolla repurposed, or ‘upcycled’ as the popular current term goes. Styling, therefore, is familiar – it was around for years as the previous generation corolla, and only a few tweaks were made when it evolved into the Quest. All the lights were changed slightly, indicators included, and the grille was made black.

Inside the design is also more-or-less the same, with a functional and well thought out dashboard that is made of hard-wearing materials. Despite the aggressive pricing, all models of the Quest come standard with manual air-conditioning, power steering, multi-information display and electric windows. The Plus model also gets a sound system complete with USB and Bluetooth connectivity.

In terms of safety, two front airbags are fitted across the range, as well as Isofix anchor points for child seats. Anti-lock Braking System with Brake Assist and Electronic Brake Force Distribution driver support systems are also standard.

While there’s only one option of engine in the Quest range, it is a lively 1.6-litre petrol unit that produces a very respectable 90kW of power and 154Nm of torque, using just 7.1 litres of petrol per 100km for the combined cycle.  A six-speed manual is available, as well as a four-speed manual.

Alloy rims glam up the appearance of the otherwise utilitarian Quest on the Plus model, while the other models use steel wheels and hubcaps. Toyota have used 195-65R15 tyres to make the Quest more affordable to run – tyres of this size are cheaper to buy and more robust against potholes and punctures than lower-profile tyres. A full-size spare wheel is also standard, which is a great feature for safety on long trips.

Offering brilliant value for money, the Corolla Quest starts at R235 000 for the entry-level model, is priced at R253 000 for the Plus model, and R252 500 for the auto. A warranty of 3 years or 100 000 km is standard, as is a service plan of 3-services/45 000km.   

In a world where the SUV is all the rage, some of us still believe that a sedan offers great all-round versatility, especially when it’s a value sedan like the Toyota Corolla Quest.

The Toyota Corolla Quest remains one of the best of the bunch when it comes to reminding us of how practical a sedan – the style of car that most of us grew up travelling in – is for everything from the weekly errands to the annual holiday.

The Quest is the budget-friendly variant in the Corolla line-up, and Toyota is able to offer it at the price they do because it is actually the previous generation Corolla repurposed, or ‘upcycled’ as the popular current term goes. Styling, therefore, is familiar – it was around for years as the previous generation corolla, and only a few tweaks were made when it evolved into the Quest. All the lights were changed slightly, indicators included, and the grille was made black.

Inside the design is also more-or-less the same, with a functional and well thought out dashboard that is made of hard-wearing materials. Despite the aggressive pricing, all models of the Quest come standard with manual air-conditioning, power steering, multi-information display and electric windows. The Plus model also gets a sound system complete with USB and Bluetooth connectivity.

In terms of safety, two front airbags are fitted across the range, as well as Isofix anchor points for child seats. Anti-lock Braking System with Brake Assist and Electronic Brake Force Distribution driver support systems are also standard.

While there’s only one option of engine in the Quest range, it is a lively 1.6-litre petrol unit that produces a very respectable 90kW of power and 154Nm of torque, using just 7.1 litres of petrol per 100km for the combined cycle.  A six-speed manual is available, as well as a four-speed manual.

Alloy rims glam up the appearance of the otherwise utilitarian Quest on the Plus model, while the other models use steel wheels and hubcaps. Toyota have used 195-65R15 tyres to make the Quest more affordable to run – tyres of this size are cheaper to buy and more robust against potholes and punctures than lower-profile tyres. A full-size spare wheel is also standard, which is a great feature for safety on long trips.

Offering brilliant value for money, the Corolla Quest starts at R235 000 for the entry-level model, is priced at R253 000 for the Plus model, and R252 500 for the auto. A warranty of 3 years or 100 000 km is standard, as is a service plan of 3-services/45 000km.