FAVOURITES{{shortlistedCars}}
LOGIN
Navigating a four-way stop - Media

Advice

Navigating a four-way stop

In theory, a four-way stop is a simple tool to ensure smooth traffic flow at a dangerous or busy intersection.

Navigating a four-way stop

Navigating a four-way stop

 

In theory, a four-way stop is a simple tool to ensure smooth traffic flow at a dangerous or busy intersection.

Before we discuss how to approach a four-way stop, we need to know what a four-way stop is. An intersection is where two roads meet, and there are a number of ways they can do this. When two roads cross over each other, often at a 90° angle to each other, some form of traffic control is needed to make this intersection safe. Cars will be approaching from four directions, and without some sort of control there will be accidents. At very busy intersections traffic is often controlled by traffic lights or robots. Another option is a traffic circle (which comes with its own confusion and difficulties!), while two-, three- and four-way stops are also common.

A four-way stop is when there is a stop sign at each of the four points of entry to the intersection. This means that every car approaching must not only slow down, but come to a complete stop before proceeding when it is safe to do so.

This is easy when you are the only vehicle at the intersection: you slow down, stop, look left and right to see that no one is going to jump the intersection, and proceed.

When there is another vehicle, things get slightly more complicated, but not much. The golden rule with four-way stops is: first come, first proceed.

So if you approach a four-way stop and there is one car at each other stop street, you need to wait for every car there to go before you. They should proceed in the order they arrived.

If there are queues of cars at the four-way stop, things still proceed as per the golden rule: first come, first proceed. What the rule means here, though, is that it is the first car to reach the Stop line to proceed, so if there are three cars backed up at another stop sign when you arrive, you only wait for the car at the front of that queue, then you go. It all makes sense when you understand, we promise!

If two cars arrive at the intersection at exactly the same time, the one wanting to turn left and the other wanting to turn right, it is the vehicle wanting to turn left that has right of way.

If four cars all arrive at the intersection at the same time, the K53 does to seem to stipulate which car goes first, but general consensus is that the car on the right should yield to the car on the left.

Also remember that when your get to a four-way intersection with traffic lights, but the traffic lights are not working, you need to treat the intersection as a four-way stop! If everyone does this then traffic will proceed surprisingly quickly and smoothly.

 

 

Tips:

Don’t forget to use your indicators! This can make things a lot quick, less frustrating and safer.

Stay calm – don’t panic and get flustered. Four-way stops are easy, safe and effective when the rules are adhered to.

Our ‘Silver’ Rule: Safety first – if two cars proceed from a stop at the same time, remain calm and proceed safely, even if it means allowing the car to proceed before you despite you feeling that it isn’t fair.

Navigating a four-way stop

 

In theory, a four-way stop is a simple tool to ensure smooth traffic flow at a dangerous or busy intersection.

Before we discuss how to approach a four-way stop, we need to know what a four-way stop is. An intersection is where two roads meet, and there are a number of ways they can do this. When two roads cross over each other, often at a 90° angle to each other, some form of traffic control is needed to make this intersection safe. Cars will be approaching from four directions, and without some sort of control there will be accidents. At very busy intersections traffic is often controlled by traffic lights or robots. Another option is a traffic circle (which comes with its own confusion and difficulties!), while two-, three- and four-way stops are also common.

A four-way stop is when there is a stop sign at each of the four points of entry to the intersection. This means that every car approaching must not only slow down, but come to a complete stop before proceeding when it is safe to do so.

This is easy when you are the only vehicle at the intersection: you slow down, stop, look left and right to see that no one is going to jump the intersection, and proceed.

When there is another vehicle, things get slightly more complicated, but not much. The golden rule with four-way stops is: first come, first proceed.

So if you approach a four-way stop and there is one car at each other stop street, you need to wait for every car there to go before you. They should proceed in the order they arrived.

If there are queues of cars at the four-way stop, things still proceed as per the golden rule: first come, first proceed. What the rule means here, though, is that it is the first car to reach the Stop line to proceed, so if there are three cars backed up at another stop sign when you arrive, you only wait for the car at the front of that queue, then you go. It all makes sense when you understand, we promise!

If two cars arrive at the intersection at exactly the same time, the one wanting to turn left and the other wanting to turn right, it is the vehicle wanting to turn left that has right of way.

If four cars all arrive at the intersection at the same time, the K53 does to seem to stipulate which car goes first, but general consensus is that the car on the right should yield to the car on the left.

Also remember that when your get to a four-way intersection with traffic lights, but the traffic lights are not working, you need to treat the intersection as a four-way stop! If everyone does this then traffic will proceed surprisingly quickly and smoothly.

 

 

Tips:

Don’t forget to use your indicators! This can make things a lot quick, less frustrating and safer.

Stay calm – don’t panic and get flustered. Four-way stops are easy, safe and effective when the rules are adhered to.

Our ‘Silver’ Rule: Safety first – if two cars proceed from a stop at the same time, remain calm and proceed safely, even if it means allowing the car to proceed before you despite you feeling that it isn’t fair.