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Dangers of Texting and Driving - Media

Advice

Dangers of Texting and Driving

Using your phone makes you blind!

Dangers of Texting and Driving

Using your phone makes you blind!

 

We are constantly reminded of the dangers of driving while using a phone, but almost every day we see drivers using their handset to talk or, even worse, text while driving. A terrifying statistic suggests that up to 40% of drivers at any given time are using or distracted by their phones, and that 88% of drivers take the risk at some stage! And despite all the awareness around the danger, the World Health Organisation (WHO) indicates that the growth in the use of cell phones in cars increased by up to 11% across a number of countries in the last five years. More research indicates that drivers who use their phone while driving are four times more likely to be in an accident than those who don’t. Text messaging has an even more significant effect.

The most obvious risk is that you take your eyes off the road for a second or two and have an accident. But the additional dangers of using a phone while you drive are more subtle than only this, as your distraction continues for a few seconds after you put your phone down. While you use your phone, your brain moves concentration elsewhere, and it takes a while to come back. Studies have shown that drivers using their cell phones reduce their visual scanning of the road ahead, respond more slowly to road hazards and are more likely to wander across lane markings. And while you are distracted by your phone, you are effectively ‘blind’, a phenomenon called ‘inattention blindness’. 

Eugene Herbert, managing director of driver-training organisation MasterDrive, says, “A large portion of drivers are driving over 90m every so often with the same attention and vision capabilities of someone wearing a blindfold! A driver experiencing inattention blindness can look straight at a stop sign or pedestrians but not consciously register those items or individuals at all.”

All new Toyota and Lexus vehicles fitted with an audio system also come standard with Bluetooth telephony systems in a bid to make our roads safer for all. If you have this technology available, it is your responsibility to make use of it. While Bluetooth systems can help to make driving safer, studies have shown that even this does cause an element of distraction from the road, meaning that the ultimate answer to the question of cell phone safety while driving is to limit your phone usage as far as possible while driving.

 

Using your phone makes you blind!

 

We are constantly reminded of the dangers of driving while using a phone, but almost every day we see drivers using their handset to talk or, even worse, text while driving. A terrifying statistic suggests that up to 40% of drivers at any given time are using or distracted by their phones, and that 88% of drivers take the risk at some stage! And despite all the awareness around the danger, the World Health Organisation (WHO) indicates that the growth in the use of cell phones in cars increased by up to 11% across a number of countries in the last five years. More research indicates that drivers who use their phone while driving are four times more likely to be in an accident than those who don’t. Text messaging has an even more significant effect.

The most obvious risk is that you take your eyes off the road for a second or two and have an accident. But the additional dangers of using a phone while you drive are more subtle than only this, as your distraction continues for a few seconds after you put your phone down. While you use your phone, your brain moves concentration elsewhere, and it takes a while to come back. Studies have shown that drivers using their cell phones reduce their visual scanning of the road ahead, respond more slowly to road hazards and are more likely to wander across lane markings. And while you are distracted by your phone, you are effectively ‘blind’, a phenomenon called ‘inattention blindness’. 

Eugene Herbert, managing director of driver-training organisation MasterDrive, says, “A large portion of drivers are driving over 90m every so often with the same attention and vision capabilities of someone wearing a blindfold! A driver experiencing inattention blindness can look straight at a stop sign or pedestrians but not consciously register those items or individuals at all.”

All new Toyota and Lexus vehicles fitted with an audio system also come standard with Bluetooth telephony systems in a bid to make our roads safer for all. If you have this technology available, it is your responsibility to make use of it. While Bluetooth systems can help to make driving safer, studies have shown that even this does cause an element of distraction from the road, meaning that the ultimate answer to the question of cell phone safety while driving is to limit your phone usage as far as possible while driving.