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CV joints ( Contant Velocity Joint) - Media

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CV joints ( Contant Velocity Joint)

A knocking noise when you turn?

CV joints ( Contant Velocity Joint)

A knocking noise when you turn?

Does your car make a knocking noise as you turn? If so, the CV joints ( Contant Velocity Joint) may need looking at. Here are five bad CV symptoms:

  • Grease on your tyres: If there's a strange liquid on the inside of your tyres, it might just be the CV joints are leaking. No, don't put your finger into the grease and then taste it – take your car in for a check.
  • Grease on your boots: Grease leaking from the CV boots (on the inside of the wheel) can mean that CV joints need maintenance.
  • Knocking on movement: Sometimes you will hear a knocking from the front or rear, even when the car is being driven in a straight line. To check if it’s the CV joints, put your car into reverse and accelerate then decelerate, and repeat a few times. If there's a regular, loud knocking, get it tested by your dealership, but at least you will have an idea of where it's coming from.
  • More knocking: The best known CV joint tell-tale sign is knocking while you're turning. This is usually a loud knocking or clicking. Turn the steering to full lock and reverse – the sound should be even worse if it is the CV joints.
  • Bit of a bounce: If your car is a bit bumpy on a flat tarred road, it might not be the suspension but the CV joints. Check both at a dealership.
  • Bad vibrations: Vibrations while you're driving can be a sign of bad wheel alignment, wheels out of balance, worn shocks or, yes, worn CV joints.

CV joints are also known as Constant Velocity joints, and there are inner and outer CV joints. The inner CV joints connect the drive shafts to the transmission. Outer CV joints join the drive shafts to the wheels. Contrary to popular belief, CV joints are not just found on front-wheel-drive vehicles, but also on rear-wheel-drive and 4x4 vehicles. CV joints can last for many years and many hundreds of thousands of kilometres, as long as the boot doesn’t get damaged. When this cracks or is damaged, though, the CV joints can deteriorate quickly.  

CV joints are an essential part of your vehicle, transferring power from the engine to the wheels, via the transmission and drive shafts. So when they break, your car will lost power and maybe come to a standstill. There is also the real possibility of damaging other costly components.

Catch it early: If you suspect that your CV joints need attention and catch it early, they can be repacked with grease and have the boot replaced. This can make them good to go again. If you leave it too late, they might need to be fully reconditioned or replaced, which can be a pricey business.

TIP: When you take your car in to Toyota for a service, ask the mechanic to show you where the CV joint boots are, so that you know where to look for leaks or cracks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Put this up front in the intro [CA3]

 

 

 

A knocking noise when you turn?

Does your car make a knocking noise as you turn? If so, the CV joints ( Contant Velocity Joint) may need looking at. Here are five bad CV symptoms:

  • Grease on your tyres: If there's a strange liquid on the inside of your tyres, it might just be the CV joints are leaking. No, don't put your finger into the grease and then taste it – take your car in for a check.
  • Grease on your boots: Grease leaking from the CV boots (on the inside of the wheel) can mean that CV joints need maintenance.
  • Knocking on movement: Sometimes you will hear a knocking from the front or rear, even when the car is being driven in a straight line. To check if it’s the CV joints, put your car into reverse and accelerate then decelerate, and repeat a few times. If there's a regular, loud knocking, get it tested by your dealership, but at least you will have an idea of where it's coming from.
  • More knocking: The best known CV joint tell-tale sign is knocking while you're turning. This is usually a loud knocking or clicking. Turn the steering to full lock and reverse – the sound should be even worse if it is the CV joints.
  • Bit of a bounce: If your car is a bit bumpy on a flat tarred road, it might not be the suspension but the CV joints. Check both at a dealership.
  • Bad vibrations: Vibrations while you're driving can be a sign of bad wheel alignment, wheels out of balance, worn shocks or, yes, worn CV joints.

CV joints are also known as Constant Velocity joints, and there are inner and outer CV joints. The inner CV joints connect the drive shafts to the transmission. Outer CV joints join the drive shafts to the wheels. Contrary to popular belief, CV joints are not just found on front-wheel-drive vehicles, but also on rear-wheel-drive and 4x4 vehicles. CV joints can last for many years and many hundreds of thousands of kilometres, as long as the boot doesn’t get damaged. When this cracks or is damaged, though, the CV joints can deteriorate quickly.  

CV joints are an essential part of your vehicle, transferring power from the engine to the wheels, via the transmission and drive shafts. So when they break, your car will lost power and maybe come to a standstill. There is also the real possibility of damaging other costly components.

Catch it early: If you suspect that your CV joints need attention and catch it early, they can be repacked with grease and have the boot replaced. This can make them good to go again. If you leave it too late, they might need to be fully reconditioned or replaced, which can be a pricey business.

TIP: When you take your car in to Toyota for a service, ask the mechanic to show you where the CV joint boots are, so that you know where to look for leaks or cracks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Put this up front in the intro [CA3]