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Changing a spare wheel - Media

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Changing a spare wheel

It happens to all of us at some stage

Changing a spare wheel

Changing a spare wheel

 

It happens to all of us at some stage – the wobbly steering wheel, the strange noise coming from a wheel, vibrations as you drive. This means that your car has a flat tyre. Flat tyres are at best an inconvenience, and at worst they can be dangerous, so it’s vital that every driver knows how to change a flat tyre quickly and efficiently. Here’s how:

 

1.Pull over at a safe place. Ensure that your vehicle is stopped in a flat spot safe from other traffic, put on the vehicle’s hazard lights and hand brake, and get out carefully. Also remember to leave your car in gear or in Park if automatic.

2. Put your little red emergency triangle about 20 metres behind your car.

3.If your car has hubcaps, remove the one from the flat wheel.

4.Get the jack, wheel spanner and spare wheel and take them to near the flat wheel.

5.Slide the jack into position, under the lifting point closest to the flat tyre. (If you’re not sure where the lifting point is on your Toyota, look in the owner’s manual, to be found in the cubby hole.)

6.Raise the jack until it just applying pressure on the car. Don’t lift it into the air just yet.

7.Using the wheel spanner, loosen the wheel nuts just a tiny bit. (If you wait until the car is in the air to do this you end up turning the wheel when trying to loosen tight wheel nuts.)

8.Using the jack, lift the car so that the flat wheel is off the ground.

9.Remove the wheel nuts with the wheel spanner and then remove the flat wheel.

10.Slide the flat wheel under the car as a safety precaution in case your car falls off the jack (which it won’t because you’re parked on a flat spot, in gear with the handbrake on!).

11.Slide the spare wheel (which is correctly inflated because you always remember to check it when you put in fuel, right?) into place on the wheel hub.

12.Replace the wheel nuts, tightening them by hand.

13.When the wheel nuts are tightened by hand, use the wheel spanner to tighten them properly, but in a specific order: do one wheel nut a bit, then the one opposite it a bit, then the one next to the first one, and then the one opposite it. Repeat this, tightening a bit at a time, until the wheel nuts are tightly secured. This method helps to keep the wheel evenly secured to the hub.

14.Remove the spare wheel from under the car, take down the jack and place everything in the boot of your car (don’t forget the red triangle!).

15.Get back into your car and re-join traffic safely.

16.Get your flat wheel repaired as soon as you can and put your spare back in the boot, because you never know when you’ll get another puncture.

 

TIP: If your spare wheel is a thin ‘Marie biscuit’, stick to the recommended speed limit marked on it (usually 80km/h) – it is dangerous to exceed this speed.

 

 

NOTE:

Some people aren’t physically strong enough to change a tyre. In this case, slow your car to a safe speed (about 30km/h) and make your way to a place where you can get assistance, such as a filling station.

All New Toyotas come standard with Roadside Assistance* as part of the warranty, for the same duration as the warranty, which can easily be accessed through the MyToyota App.

 

South Africa Only: 0800 022 600 or 0800 139 111 (toll free)

 

 

*Ts&Cs Apply

 

Changing a spare wheel

 

It happens to all of us at some stage – the wobbly steering wheel, the strange noise coming from a wheel, vibrations as you drive. This means that your car has a flat tyre. Flat tyres are at best an inconvenience, and at worst they can be dangerous, so it’s vital that every driver knows how to change a flat tyre quickly and efficiently. Here’s how:

 

1.Pull over at a safe place. Ensure that your vehicle is stopped in a flat spot safe from other traffic, put on the vehicle’s hazard lights and hand brake, and get out carefully. Also remember to leave your car in gear or in Park if automatic.

2. Put your little red emergency triangle about 20 metres behind your car.

3.If your car has hubcaps, remove the one from the flat wheel.

4.Get the jack, wheel spanner and spare wheel and take them to near the flat wheel.

5.Slide the jack into position, under the lifting point closest to the flat tyre. (If you’re not sure where the lifting point is on your Toyota, look in the owner’s manual, to be found in the cubby hole.)

6.Raise the jack until it just applying pressure on the car. Don’t lift it into the air just yet.

7.Using the wheel spanner, loosen the wheel nuts just a tiny bit. (If you wait until the car is in the air to do this you end up turning the wheel when trying to loosen tight wheel nuts.)

8.Using the jack, lift the car so that the flat wheel is off the ground.

9.Remove the wheel nuts with the wheel spanner and then remove the flat wheel.

10.Slide the flat wheel under the car as a safety precaution in case your car falls off the jack (which it won’t because you’re parked on a flat spot, in gear with the handbrake on!).

11.Slide the spare wheel (which is correctly inflated because you always remember to check it when you put in fuel, right?) into place on the wheel hub.

12.Replace the wheel nuts, tightening them by hand.

13.When the wheel nuts are tightened by hand, use the wheel spanner to tighten them properly, but in a specific order: do one wheel nut a bit, then the one opposite it a bit, then the one next to the first one, and then the one opposite it. Repeat this, tightening a bit at a time, until the wheel nuts are tightly secured. This method helps to keep the wheel evenly secured to the hub.

14.Remove the spare wheel from under the car, take down the jack and place everything in the boot of your car (don’t forget the red triangle!).

15.Get back into your car and re-join traffic safely.

16.Get your flat wheel repaired as soon as you can and put your spare back in the boot, because you never know when you’ll get another puncture.

 

TIP: If your spare wheel is a thin ‘Marie biscuit’, stick to the recommended speed limit marked on it (usually 80km/h) – it is dangerous to exceed this speed.

 

 

NOTE:

Some people aren’t physically strong enough to change a tyre. In this case, slow your car to a safe speed (about 30km/h) and make your way to a place where you can get assistance, such as a filling station.

All New Toyotas come standard with Roadside Assistance* as part of the warranty, for the same duration as the warranty, which can easily be accessed through the MyToyota App.

 

South Africa Only: 0800 022 600 or 0800 139 111 (toll free)

 

 

*Ts&Cs Apply